A Summary of common distributions

A Uniform(0, 1) distribution spinner. The values in the picture are rounded to two decimal places, but in the idealized model the spinner is infitely precise so that any real number between 0 and 1 is a possible value.

Figure A.1: A Uniform(0, 1) distribution spinner. The values in the picture are rounded to two decimal places, but in the idealized model the spinner is infitely precise so that any real number between 0 and 1 is a possible value.

An Exponential(1) distribution spinner. The values in the picture are rounded to two decimal places, but in the idealized model the spinner is infitely precise so that any real number between 0 and \(\infty\) is a possible value. The spinner is duplicated on the right; the highlighted sectors illustrate the non-linearity of axis values and how this corresponds to the cdf \(F_X(x)=1-e^{-x}, x>0\).An Exponential(1) distribution spinner. The values in the picture are rounded to two decimal places, but in the idealized model the spinner is infitely precise so that any real number between 0 and \(\infty\) is a possible value. The spinner is duplicated on the right; the highlighted sectors illustrate the non-linearity of axis values and how this corresponds to the cdf \(F_X(x)=1-e^{-x}, x>0\).

Figure A.2: An Exponential(1) distribution spinner. The values in the picture are rounded to two decimal places, but in the idealized model the spinner is infitely precise so that any real number between 0 and \(\infty\) is a possible value. The spinner is duplicated on the right; the highlighted sectors illustrate the non-linearity of axis values and how this corresponds to the cdf \(F_X(x)=1-e^{-x}, x>0\).